Sundews - Drosera

Sundews need lots of sunlight, they can take it without any shade cloth provided they are standing in a tray of 1-2cm of rain water. The tray is not a must, but an insurance against drying out - Sundew dies rather quickly if dehydrated. The soil has to be be more soggy than for Nepenthes, coco peat does a good job, but it needs to be replaced, once it looks clayish and the sundew is looking less happy. Many sundews enjoy 50% silica sand (nope, not river/beach sand!) in their media. If sundew doesn't get enough sun it might lack red coloration and be more vulnerable to aphid attack, which can cripple the leaves. For us they get aphids if at all during flowering as the plant gets exhausted and the aphids will disappear thereafter, once the plant recovers. Sundew doesn't really like to be watered on the top, or being exposed to rain. If you can, you should try to shelter them, while maintaing high light levels.

What to do after arrival?
Please note that sundew doesn't look very pretty after mailing, as the glue usually disappears and mixes with the soil. During this time keep the plant out of direct sun and well watered. Sundew can not have too much water. The old leaves might not become pretty again, but the newly grown ones will be. It is fast growing and should be back at full beauty in 1-3 weeks. After a week it can be gradually exposed to more sun.
Sundew likes to catch long legged or large winged insects that mistake the glue drops for water. While it usually goes for fruit fly sized insects, it also catches mosquitos or even moths, or butterflies.

D. adelae

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Php 600 (reduced from P700)

This is one of the famous Queensland sundews. Why famous? Because they inhabit a different habitat compared to what sundews usually like. They like high humidity, while not needing an awful lot of light. Still I wouldn't recommend to grow it indoors, but you are welcome to try near a window. If ever the plant doesn't perform well, check the undersides of the leaves for pest. If ever the main plant dies, it will be usually replaced by offspring. Still it is not exactly a beginners plant according to other growers :)

D. admirabilis, Ceres

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D. admirabilis looks very much alike to D. cuneifolia. However, oppposite to that it piles several layers of live leafs on top of each other and grows year round, while D. cuneifolia prefers the wet and cool season.

D. affinis

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Php 800

A sundew that occurs in middle and eastern Africa. It starts harmless as a spathulata-like basal rosette, then looks like a red Drosera intermedia for a while, but suddenly starts forming a stem and leaving the pot :) climbing up to 25 cm and turning the plant quite spectacular. Now available!

D. afra

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A south African tuberous winter growing sundew. This plant looks a lot like the more common D. trinervia but sans the nerves. Winter growing means, it does rest during dry season and retracts into an underground tuber. Here the leaves will disappear and it should not be kept wet, but also not totally dry up. Some growers recommend using very tall pots to keep the tubers away from the water tray water level, but also to avoid them running dry. Anyway, as you might guess, this plant is not exactly for beginners.

D. aliciae

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A south African sundew with rosette sizes up to 5 cm. It's a very common plant found in many collections. Given enough sunshine, the whole plant can turn red. Although it looks very similar to D. spathulata, this one is much more sensitive when it comes to rain exposure. I know it has been on this website without being available for some years, but "change" is indeed coming ;-)

D. binata var. dichotoma

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Php 400

The Australian Drosera binata is normally growing erect T-shaped leafs that can attain remarkable sizes. Once this specific form of D. binata gets a little older, the leaves will be four-tipped and so heavy that they won't be upright anymore. You can consider growing it in a hanging pot for better display. The plant is capable of catching mosquitos and rarely even flies. If ever your plant totally disappears from its pot - don't give up - there is a chance that it returns after having a rest. Please note that we used to call this form 'multifida' previously, but decided to use the somewhat outdated term 'var. dichotoma' to specifically indicate the usually 4 tipped ends of the adult leaves. Yes, this could indicate that we are offering something seriously multi-tipped soon... :-)

D. binata small T-form

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This one is small compared to our other D. binata. It usually has T-shaped leaves, although sometimes it throws out a 3rd tip. But because of the small size, the leaves are often standing upright especially if planted in groups, which gives it a nice appearance bonus. Propagation ongoing.

D. binata "Tairua Bog, NZ"

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A small binata form from Coromandel, New Zealand, 10-20cm tall, doing only the regular T-shaped forks. Unlike the Australian binatas this form is self fertile.

D. brevifolia

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A small rosette shaped sundew from North and South America. With "small" I mean even smaller than D.spathulata - its about a one Peso coin at most. On the plus side the whole plant turns red/pink, hinting that it enjoys loads of sun. The flower stalks are tiny too, only about 5 cm, but the flowers are much larger than those of it's close relative D. capilaris. The plant sometimes dies after flowering, but somehow it easily survives that :) Because the plant frequently produces offspring around it, possibly originating from seeds or the tips of the decaying leaves.

D. burmannii

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Php 200

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Php 500 (P100 per plant!)

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Php 1500 (P75 per plant!)

Drosera burmannii is found all over South East Asia down to Australia. The rosette gets up to 5 cm diameter. It has one of the fastest moving tentacles in the genus that can move after an insect within seconds. Notice the two layers of tentacles having a different length and shape. Just put an aphid sized insect on the outer tentacles and you will be amazed how it is catapulted to the center of leaf - no time lapse needed :) This plant gets weak and greenish after flowering, but will regain strength quickly. Please note that this plant can die after flowering> To prevent this you should feed it if you grow it indoors. We don't bother with it, as they produce lots of seeds and offspring automatically. Our sales plants have a size like a Peso coin.

D. burmannii "Humpty Doo"

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This is a local form of Drosera burmannii from an area called Humpty Doo or nicknamed 'HD'. Humpty Doo is in the northern territories in Australia about 40km from Darwin. The plants here can get totally red when having lots of exposure to sun, adding even more thrill to a very fun to grow plant. Propagation is on full steam and will be released in a few months.

D. burmannii "Tumbling Waters"

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Like burmanni "Humpty Doo" this Sundew is also from the Northern Territories near Darwin in Australia. I wouldn't be too surprised if it will have just the same looks. So far it flowered at an amazing small size with a tiny flower stalk, so this could be a dwarf form.

D. capensis

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Php 500 (reduced from P700!)

This classic South African sundew is very common in collections all over the world, as it is an easy grower and quite spectacular - in the tropics it is not as easy, but can be negotiated. This classic capensis form has red tentacles on green leaves. Watch out for aphids on the growing leaves as they can cripple them. Keep in mind that aphids on sundew are often an indication for low light levels. It does have relatively large leafs that can bend over the prey to protect it from predators and rain, but also to intensify digestion.

D. capensis alba

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Just the same like the other D. capensis, but without any red pigments. This includes the flower that is white. Then alba forms tend to get a bit larger than the red ones if I remember right. For D. capensis be always on the watch for aphids, as they can cripple the leaves and "keep the plant small". You can use a brush that you dip in Sundew-glue to catch them. Don't use pesticides - stay green! The more sun these plants get, the stronger they are against aphids. Propagation ongoing.

D. capensis Mini Red

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This is a miniature capensis. The 'red' seems to refer only to the tentacle color, so it is relatively typical. The flowers are on short scapes with serrated petals.

D. capensis, stem forming, Bains Kloof

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As the name indicates this one is forming a stem, which to my knowledge most capensis do, but we shall see, once these plants mature. There are some pretty spectacular Bains Kloof images out there, that look much more compact than your average capensis, but those are hybrids with spathulata as it seems. Bains Kloof is a large region and houses many different kinds of D. capensis, so the emphasis of this form is "stem forming".

D. capensis Triffid Rose

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There is an all red form of Drosera capensis, but it happens to be somewhat small. Therefore the natural thing for a horticulturist to do is to make a cross of the small red for with a broad leaf form to a get new large pink capensis form.

D. capensis Giant Form

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Drosera capensis is already one of the larger sundews, therefore this giant form makes it even more appealing and dangerous for its prey. Our plants are still in their infancy stage and also eating. :-).

D. capensis Giant form, R. Seine, Zimbabwe

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Another giant form from a different source and possibly location. Let's see which one gets more gigantic.

D. capensis Vogelgat Nature Reserve

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A D.capensis with typical coloration from South Africa. So far it seems to be narrow leaved and growing quickly. Adult plants can reach 27 cm diameter.

D. capensis broad leaf

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A D. capensis with typical coloration, but much fatter leaves.

D. capillaris, Pasco Co, Florida

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Drosera capillaris s a very common sundew in the Americas. Usually it can be found growing together with Sarracenia, Dr. filiformis and sometimes even Pinguicula. Being from Florida, it should cope well with Philippine climate.

D. capillaris Long Leaf Form

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This form differs from the typical ground rosette by having long and elevated petioles, which could be an indication that hybridized with D. intermedia. In fact it looks quite a bit like D. intermedia, but it is more heavy duty aside from the usual differences in flower and seed details. It's a very friendly and prolific plant. Did I mention lots of glue? :)

D. collinsiae Faryland

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D. collinsiae is from South Africa and has spoon shaped leaves that are elevated and looks a lot like D. nidiformis. However the Faryland form is suspected to be a hybrid of D. burkeana and D. madagascariensis by some growers. They form nice balls full of sparkling leaves. Picture shows germinating plant.

D. cucculata "Phillips Range, Kimberly"

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Another new member of the Drosera indica complex that was described by Lowrie in 2013. I doesn't sound too different form the regular Dr. indica, but the flower has blood red stamens, deltoid, curved, hooded.

D. cuneifolia

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A south African rosette shaped sundew that is very notable due to its fat glue laden leaves. The whole plant can get an astonishing diameter up to 15 cm. It will take us a while to have sales stocks propagated, but we are working on it! Similar to D. burmannii some leaves also have an outer layer of snap tentacles that can throw a prey within a few seconds to the center of the leaf.

D. filiformis

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Php 450

Similar to D. tracyi, but it has smaller leaves with red tentacles. The smaller leaves allow them to stand upright, giving the plant a prettier appearance. It seems also less eager to do hibernation.

D. filiformis 'California Sunset'

The hybrid of Dr. filiformis with Dr. tracyi was made in 1973. Leaves can get 50 cm long, tentacle color deep pink or light red. Flowers can be large like Dr. tracyi.

D. filiformis 'all red'

While our regular D. filiformis gets also a nice red tint (esp. the tentacles) when exposed to the sun, this form turns red all over. This form originates from north of Greenhead, Washington Co., in Florida. Our propagation is still in its early stages, but it should show up for sale in near future.

D. hirticalyx

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A small very red rosetted Sundew from Venezuela, that grows on towers of old leaves. Hirticalyx refers to the hairy sepals.

D. indica

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Php 200

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Php 600

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Php 900

This is a very spectacular species due to its size and hunger and best of that it is native to the tropical lowlands. D. indica is an annual plant and might die after flowering. However, the flowers are self-pollinating and will sow many baby plants around the mother, so you should be able to keep it up and running without doing anything to support the propagation. When it falls to it's side allow it to rest on some wet media, as it will grow new aerial roots then and become stronger. Some customers say this plant always dies quickly, while others say it's the most sturdy/weedy sundew. It also doesn't mind being exposed to the rain. This might be an interesting candidate for large scale mosquito eradication, as we can provide it in quantity at low prices and it is relatively large as well. The indica complex has been divided in more than a dozen very similar species recently, while for our clone D. indica still seems to be the most accurate name.

D. intermedia

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Php 300

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Php 1000

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Php 1500

D. intermedia is one of the global players, as you can find this plants in numerous countries, no matter if temperate - almost artic or tropical climate. We were able to import a new variety that seems to love the Philippines... Sales plants have about 5 cm diameter, but can reach up to 10 cm becoming a serious threat to mosquitoes. Make sure their soil never runs dry (tray!). They are also an aphids favorite, as the petioles have no glue protecting them.

D. kaieteurensis, Chimanta Tepui

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Now this South American fellow from the Tepuis of Guyana and Venuzuela is seriously small with a diameter of less than 1 cm. Even the flower stalk doesn't reach more than 3cm. Altitude is from 400-2400m. Synonymous with D. felix and very similar to D. solaris.

D. sp. "Lantau Island Hybrid"

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A natural hybrid between D. oblanceolata and D. spathulata occuring in Lantau Island, Hong Kong. Originating not so far from the Philippines it can handle heat well, but it doesn't like being hit by rain. Still a newcomer to our farm, but given the intensity of growth it should be available 'soon' :)

D. latifolia

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Php 700

This is a south American sundew that is sort of a highlander as it supposedly prefers temperatures below 25C and a good night temperature drop. It is quite large getting near the size of D. capensis. For us it performs very well, so we were able to reduce prices already. While it doesn't exactly have snap tentacles like D. burmannii or even D. glanduligera, the tentacle movement of this plant is fast, you can see them moving prey to the center of the leaf within a few seconds! This plant arrived labeled as D. ascendens, but this name has been updated to D. latifolia, as the original D. ascendens has been rediscovered and happens to look a bit different. Back in stock!

D. madagascariensis

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Drosera madagascariensis is not only found in Madagascar but in much of tropical Africa including South America. It is an easy stem forming plant, at first upright and at a certain weight it falls to the side and continues as a scrambler for up to several feet. It is very similar to D. affinis and not much detail can be found online about the difference. So far D. madagascariensis has a nice mix of green and red and feels less flimsy than D. affinis and is easy enough to distinguish.

D. natalensis "Tsitsikamma National Park, RSA"

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A pink flowered rosetted sundew from South Africa, that is easily confused with Dr. dielsiana. Should be a very beginner friendly plant as well.

D. neocaledonica

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From the unique location of the island of Neo Caledonia, this sundew belongs to the D. spathulata complex and shares a bit of similarities with D. ultramafica, which we discovered in Palawan a few years back. It is notorious for growing slowly and therefore not recommended for beginners.

D. ordensis

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Like D. paradoxa also from the Australian petiolaris complex. This is the master of body hair (yey!) and some times the leaves appear all white due to the dense indumentum.

D. paradoxa

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D. paradoxa is a pretty Sundew from northern Australia that performs well in Philippine climate. They are a member of the Petiolaris complex. However we had a caterpillar attack at an early stage, setting us back in propagation. But one day it shall be available...

D. regia

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The biggest of all sundews, capable of even trapping larger insects. The leaves can reach up to 60 cm in length. It's a south african sundew, so better practice with some Drosera capensis first, prior to trying the king.

D. x "Snyderi"

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A hybrid developed by Ivan Snyder crossing D. dielsiana with D. nidiformis. A very prolific plant, not shy on red colors and glue. The leaves should be more upright, once the plant matures. Still a newcomer to our farm, but given the intensity of growth it should be available 'soon' :)

D. spathulata

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Php 200

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Php 500 (lowered again!)

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Php 1500

This sundew is native to the Philippines and is usually found on swampy clearings of mountain forests. It forms dense rosettes and flowers non-stop, one new pink flower each day. One order is one plant at least as large as a 1 Peso coin, but only has a maximum size of 5 cm diameter even when fully adult. After a few years they form clumps that can form small towers. This plant is quite beginner friendly and rain proof.

D. spathulata Tamboon Inlet

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This plant looks like Drosera spathulata 'Fraser Island', but has a short pink flower instead. That way we can actually still distinguish it well from the other spathulatas, phew!

D. spathulata 'Fraser Island Form'

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Php 350

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Php 1200

This Australian cousin of our D. spathulata features longer and more wedge shaped leaves than the original form. Diameters up to 7cm have been recorded for mature plants in habitat. Flowers are white. It seems the regular spathulatas are more compatible with the Philippine climate, as the size of the Fraser Island form fluctuates with the different seasons (avoid rain!) and it doesn't seem to utilize its seeds for propagation (at least in our high humidity setting). There is also a D. lovellae or D. spathulata var. lovellae from the same island that seems to be just the same species.

D. x Tokaiensis

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This plant from Japan was floating around labeled as Drosera spathulata 'Kansai', but it has been concluded that is the natural hybrid of D. rotundifolia and the Kanto Form of Drosera spathulata. It is said to be one of the fastest Sundews being able to flower 4 months after germination. Despite having D. rotundifolia as one of the parents it doesn't need a winter rest.

D. tomentosa var. glabrata

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A rosetted sundew from Brazil. This form has hairless flower scapes. They are part of the Dr. montana complex and differ from Dr. montana by much broader leaves.

D. tracyi

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Php 500

This plant that is common to the southern USA develops extremely long and thin leafs giving it a grassy appearance. Due to its size reaching diameters near 50cm it is quite spectacular. On the downside it does hibernation for a few months, which is sorta boring :) Hibernation starts and stops automatically in our climate.

D. venusta "George, Oudtshoorn,RSA" x nidiformis

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A nice hybrid getting the best features of both parents, while obviously enjoying the mix of new DNA. The venusta parent originates from a mountainous area between George and Oudtshoorn in South Africa. Keep in mind that according to ICPS D. venusta, natalensis and coccicaulis are considered synonymous and that natalensis would be the proper name to be used.